Obesity During Adolescence Put Teens At Higher Risk of Chronic Disability

The American Academy of Pediatrics says1 childhood obesity is rising. Unfortunately, most children will carry their obesity towards adolescence. Also, it is not good news.

Obese Teens
Study says, Obese teens are likely to become disable in their later life.

A Swedish study2 finds that obese teens are likely to suffer chronic disability later in life. Among the diseases that these obese teenagers are likely to experience include psychiatric, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal disorders and even cancer.

Sadly, all these diseases are apparent indicators of potential premature death. Moreover, low cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity have definite health risks later in life. Also, severely obese individuals are three times at risk of likely to suffer disability during their adult life.

Hence, it is at utmost importance to maintain a physically healthy body during the early years. It is pre-requisite for children to experience a better quality of life during the later years to keep proper nutrition and stay active physically.

A study shows that training children to be physically active during the early years is beneficial for gut and metabolic health. Both of these are crucial for maintaining better health as well as keeping an ideal weight.

Obesity Affects Cognitive Function

Obesity is a metabolic disorder that can lead to various serious health condition including cancer. In adult men, obesity can have severe consequences on sexual health.

Moreover, studies have shown the unforgiving effect of obesity on memory and brain health.

Furthermore, a 2016 study3 found that overweight and obese teens are likely to suffer a decline in cognitive function later in life.

Practical Tips To Avoid Teen Obesity

The CDC has acknowledged the problem in childhood obesity. Since 1970, the present obesity rate has tripled.

If you think why such obesity rate in young people soured, what happens to the dietary guidelines?

Unfortunately, there was something wrong in the early food pyramid as a dietary guideline. But the recent nutritional guidelines seems to be better.

Unfortunately, regardless of the information campaign on the new guidelines, many people have no idea about it. Others who knew it already tends to ignore it. But why?

Probably, one reason is convenience. Cheap but unhealthy foods are readily available and very convenient to obtain. In order to live healthy, avoid and even reverse obesity, it requires effort to change.

The good news, it is worth the effort. Here some of the few practical tips that can help anyone reverse and prevent obesity. These tips are applicable for both young children, adult and older adults, as well.

For children to follow healthy lifestyle practices, parents should be the model.

  1. Maintain proper nutrition by increasing fruits and vegetable intake preferably authentic organic produce.
  2. Minimize consumption of refined sugar by replacing sugary drinks with drinking water.
  3. Reduce screen time and other sedentary practices by spending time outdoors doing physical activities.
  4. Encourage children to have regular sun exposure as it is a good source of Vitamin D.
  5. As parents, be models for your children by engaging in regular exercise like MVPA(moderate to vigorous physical activity).
  6. Minimize or better eliminate highly processed fast foods and packaged snacks through home cooking.
  7. Encourage children and teens to obtain enough sleep every night.

These are just a few healthy lifestyle practices worth doing starting today. Even though schools have roles to inform children about these healthy lifestyle practices, it should begin within the family.

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